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Posts Tagged ‘mobile phone’

Huge social shift: Cellphones now used more for data than calls

Posted by andreaitis on May 14, 2010

Phone Prop

Image by jennlynndesign via Flickr

We knew it was coming but now the numbers are in and  it’s official.

We’re well on our way to becoming an incredibly disconnected connected society.

Key stats from a New York Times story:

– Almost 90% of US households have a mobile phone

– Number of households eliminating landlines continues to increase

– Number of voice minutes used by consumers is flat

– Number of text messages sent per  user is up by almost 50%

– Thumb voted ‘favorite digit’ as thumb strength in overall US population is increasing (okay, that wasn’t in the NYT but it’s totally true, right?)

Instead of talking on their cellphones, people are making use of all the extras that iPhones, BlackBerrys and other smartphones were also designed to do — browse the Web, listen to music, watch television, play games and send e-mail and text messages.

[…]

And for the first time in the United States, the amount of data in text, e-mail messages, streaming video, music and other services on mobile devices in 2009 surpassed the amount of voice data in cellphone calls, industry executives and analysts say.

Of course, talking on the cellphone isn’t disappearing entirely. “Anytime something is sensitive or is something I don’t want to be forwarded, I pick up the phone rather than put it into a tweet or a text,” said Kristen Kulinowski, a 41-year-old chemistry teacher in Houston. And calling is cheaper than ever because of fierce competition among rival wireless networks.

via Cellphones Now Used More for Data Than for Calls – NYTimes.com

That chemistry teacher is onto something.  Don’t you agree, Mark Zuckerberg?

Meanwhile, I’m wondering what we lose by replacing talking with texting.    Is a typed exchange a less connected experience?   Does a verbal discussion translate to a deeper relationship?

We have shorter attention spans.  We consume more, more quickly.   We walk looking at our mobile devices rather than our surroundings.    We don’t make eye contact.   We don’t talk as much.  We hear less.

We are separated by a screen.

Status updates and text messages are the new soundbite.  Will that fill us up, or leave us empty?

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Posted in Business, technology | Tagged: , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Your mobile phone can diagnose your cough

Posted by andreaitis on November 10, 2009

Gotta cough? There's an app for that.

The latest in hacking technology. Literally.

Soon all you’ll have to do is  cough into your phone for an instant diagnosis. Software being developed by STAR Analytical Services will measure your cough by comparing it to a pre-recorded database of coughs.

Software being developed by American and Australian scientists will hopefully allow patients simply to cough into their phone, and it will tell them whether they have cold, flu, pneumonia or other respiratory diseases.

The software would compare the patient’s cough to a pre-recorded database of coughs, containing the sounds of all respiratory diseases from people of both sexes and various ages, weights and other variables.

Currently the STAR team has a database of several dozen patients, but they estimate they will need a total of around 1,000 before the software will be reliable.

The software is currently run on a computer, but it is anticipated that it could be rewritten as a smartphone application.

via Cough into your mobile phone for instant diagnosis – Telegraph

The project is being funded by a $100,000 grant from the  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Hmm, mobile phone diagnosis.  Would this be considered a public or private option in the health care debate?

Posted in Health, technology | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

World's first dedicated Twitter device now available. Because this is what the world needs.

Posted by andreaitis on November 3, 2009

Get a look at Twitter Peek while you can.

Get a look at Twitter Peek while you can.

The guys at Twitter apparently thought this was a good idea.  They partnered with Amol Sarva, founder of Peek Inc. , to build a new mobile device only for Twittering.  This is a variation of Peek’s other device, a “simple gadget allowing you to send and receive email while you’re on-the-go.”    Kind of like a mobile phone  minus the phone, calendar, address book, web browser, alarm clock….you know, all the other useful parts.

Anyway, the Twitter + Peek collaboration led to a version  of the Peek device exclusively  for sending tweets.

Clad in “Twitter blue,” the TwitterPeek allows all the same functionality of a desktop Twitter client – reading tweets, sending tweets, replying, retweeting and direct messaging – only it gives users that access on the go.

It’s really nothing new, though. Most new smartphones have access to Twitter. Sarva said the TwitterPeek is built for consumers looking for an affordable alternative to expensive smartphones with higher monthly fees. The TwitterPeek sells for $99 with a $7.95 monthly fee or $199 with a lifetime of service.

via The First Mobile Device Dedicated Exclusively To Twitter – Venture Capital Dispatch – WSJ

I have two questions:

1. Anyone remember the AOL Mobile Communicator?

I still have  one.  It doesn't even work all that well as a paperweight.

I still have one. It doesn't even work all that well as a paperweight.

2. Anyone still using the AOL Mobile Communicator?

[chirp. chirp.]

I rest my case.

Posted in technology | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments »

Text messaging makes children and journalists more impulsive

Posted by andreaitis on August 11, 2009

text girl

Image by uberculture via Flickr

Okay, I added the journalist part but according to a new study, the rest is true.   Using mobile phones can change how your brain works.   How many journalists do you know who do NOT use mobile phones?  You can see the logic already.

This new research is rising up from down under.  Researchers at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia studied the mobile phone use of children between 11 and 14 and their ability to carry out a series of computer tests.   They found text messaging and predictive text messaging lead children to behave impulsively and make mistakes.

When researchers studied the way in which the children handled IQ-type tests they found that increased mobile phone use appears to change the way their brains work.

Prof Abramson, an epidemiologist at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, said: “The kids who used their phones a lot were faster on some of the tests, but were less accurate.

“We suspect that using mobile phones a lot, particularly tools like predictive texts for SMS, is training them to be fast but inaccurate.

via Mobile phone text messaging is making children more impulsive, claim researchers – Telegraph

Fast but inaccurate.  Hello, Alessandra Stanley?  To quote the New York Times’ Clark Hoyt quoting Alessandra Stanley in response to her very own Walter Cronkite Seven Errors Saga:

Stanley said she was writing another article on deadline at the same time and hurriedly produced the appraisal, sending it to her editor with the intention of fact-checking it later. She never did.

“This is my fault,” she said. “There are no excuses.”

In her haste, she said, she looked up the dates for two big stories that Cronkite covered — the assassination of Martin Luther King and the moment Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon — and copied them incorrectly. She wrote that Cronkite stormed the beaches on D-Day when he actually covered the invasion from a B-17 bomber. She never meant that literally, she said. “I didn’t reread it carefully enough to see people would think he was on the sands of Omaha Beach.”

The Public Editor – How Did This Happen? – Op-Ed – NYTimes.com

Alessandra Stanley behaved impulsively and made mistakes.   I’m betting she not only uses a mobile phone, but has also done some text messaging.  I don’t know this for a fact, but you can see how the new study may explain recent journalistic errors.   Now she can change her response: It’s not my fault! There is an excuse!  We can put the blame right where it belongs: on technology and science.

This is your brain.   This is your brain on mobile phone.

I’d research all this a bit further but I’ve got to text, twitter and check Facebook right now.

Posted in technology | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

panel’ing

Posted by andreaitis on January 16, 2009

i participated in a panel this past week on the future of news and information.   it was my first public outing as a true/slant’r, and i have to admit i was a bit rusty.  all those high school theater performances and still, i get nervous.  a good warmup, though, for what’s to come.   david berkowitz has a  roundup of my  session.

mostly, i thought we barely covered the tip of the tech iceberg.  no one talked about twitter or google reader or iphones or other non-traditional methods for consuming news.    there’s a news generation gap: the people who get up in the cold, dark morning and pad down to the cold, dark front porch to bring in the newspaper … and the people who roll over, reach for the mobile phone and scroll through the news  while under the still- warm covers.   how do we close that gap?  that would have been an interesting discussion.

public speaking in this day and age is practically a contact sport  you are instantly analyzed, judged,  pummeled and (if lucky) applauded, all at the whim of wifi and mobile devices.  it makes it that much more challenging.   so next time, i’m definitely bringing my notes with me to calm my nerves.  and maybe a  small flask.  ;-j

i did wander through the harvard club after the panel.  prittee, prittee good.  and i was accosted by a man in the coat check area who was looking for a female ceo for his relationship-fixer-upper startup.  at first i thought he was waiting to meet someone in particular.  but no, it seems he was hanging out in the harvard club just hoping to meet a woman who might want to be  ceo of an alleged startup.  i guess all you need on your resume is estrogen.  any takers?

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